Jayesh Bafna 39 min

Aftermarket Excellence: Mindset, not company size is all that matters


In this insightful episode, we engage with Jayesh Bafna (VP and GM - Aftermarket and Services at Komline Group), a veteran in the Industrial Aftermarket industry, who recounts his professional journey from Cummins, a large and well-resourced company, to Komline, a smaller, more agile organization. Jayesh explores the challenges and opportunities of this transition, emphasizing the need for consistent processes across business units and the integration of best practices in pricing and services. Jayesh underscores the crucial role of the aftermarket in fostering customer loyalty and enhancing profitability. He reflects on how long-term customer relationships and experiences are built over decades, long after the initial sale, highlighting the enduring engagement aftermarket professionals maintain with their customers. Drawing on his extensive experience, Jayesh compares working in public versus private companies, discussing how each environment influences expectations and operational strategies. He shares how limited resources can drive innovation and adaptability, a lesson he learned from his upbringing in Mumbai. Throughout the conversation, Jayesh attributes his success to a blend of luck, supportive mentors, and a deep passion for his work. He stresses the importance of continuous learning and the value of being surrounded by intelligent, motivated individuals. This episode offers a comprehensive look into the Industrial Aftermarket industry, providing valuable insights into customer loyalty, operational efficiency, and the advantages of working in diverse business environments. Tune in to learn how to achieve aftermarket success from one of the industry’s most experienced professionals.



0:00

Hi folks, welcome back to season 2 of the Aftermarket Champions podcast. I'm

0:07

your host

0:08

Vivek Joshi, founder and CEO of Entitled. We help equipment manufacturers

0:12

identify, prioritize,

0:14

and sell aftermarket and service solutions to their install base. Insights, our

0:19

purpose-built

0:20

install base intelligence platform, is used by leading OEMs globally to drive

0:24

revenue growth

0:25

and improve customer experience and satisfaction. I'm delighted to be back,

0:29

fondly enriching journey

0:30

into the world of aftermarket excellence. Throughout the season, we'll engage

0:34

in an insightful

0:35

discussion with industry leaders, exploring innovative strategies and

0:39

invaluable insights

0:40

to propel us forward in industrial aftermarket sector. So, without further ado,

0:45

let's embark

0:46

on this journey together.

0:55

Hey, good afternoon everybody. This is Vivek Joshi, your host of the After

0:58

market Champions

0:59

podcast. Today, I'm delighted to welcome a new guest, Jay Shpafna, who's the

1:04

Vice President

1:05

of Aftermarket and Service at Comline. Comline is a company that's based in DC

1:09

and has operations

1:10

around the country. And I'm excited to welcome him to this week's edition of

1:14

the Aftermarket

1:16

Champions podcast. Welcome, Jay Shpafna.

1:17

Thank you, Vivek. Glad to be here.

1:20

Well, you know, I always love the fact that the guests on our podcast have such

1:24

diverse

1:25

backgrounds, a bunch of different experiences and how they got to their current

1:29

roles. Maybe

1:30

you can tell us a little bit about it yourself and how we wound up doing what

1:33

you're doing

1:34

today.

1:35

Yeah. So, I'll start from the beginning, really. So, I'm an engineer by

1:43

education. So, worked

1:46

for four years after my engineering at a company called Accenture. It's a

1:51

consulting company.

1:53

I worked as a programmer. My original plan was to work for a year and then do

1:58

my MBA.

1:58

But I loved programming so much that I spent four years before finally jumping

2:04

on to my

2:04

MBA program. Interestingly, even in the pre MBA Accenture experience, I was

2:12

building software

2:14

for a client that, an insurance client that used it for claims solutions. So,

2:22

it was really

2:23

always aftermarket and services right from day one for me. And I thoroughly

2:29

enjoyed one

2:30

of the building part. So, building the claim solution for the client. And we

2:35

really, the

2:36

fact that claims is where the customer truly gets an experience with the

2:43

company because

2:44

that's the post sales part. So, the moment of truth, right? That is the moment

2:50

of truth.

2:50

So, that somehow got me hooked on to the after service of anything. I did my

3:00

MBA. I joined

3:02

the comments engines in India in their aftermarket organization. So, I was

3:09

always, I'm still an

3:12

aftermarketer for life, I guess. So, we've got 15, 16 years now exclusively in

3:18

the aftermarket.

3:19

So, even at comments in India, it was a bunch of aftermarket roles starting

3:26

with aftermarket

3:27

strategy, pricing, product management, account management. So, I had changed

3:34

roles every

3:35

couple of years or so while in India. After six years, I decided to take up a

3:42

role here

3:43

in the US. So, Cummins Inc, based out of Columbus, Indiana, had an opportunity

3:50

available. So,

3:52

I applied, got into it and then relocated my family and then spent five years

4:00

at Cummins.

4:01

Again, in the aftermarket in the product management group where I ran a big

4:09

chunk of the aftermarket

4:10

business. So, after that, after running it for about five years or so, I

4:18

decided to switch

4:20

gears and join Comline. So, it was not so much of an intentional move, but more

4:25

so of a

4:26

by chance that this opportunity came across and I thought, hey, why not try

4:30

something

4:31

different. So, moved from a 34 billion dollar company with 75,000 people to a

4:38

much smaller

4:39

organization, about $200 million and about 450 people. So, significantly a

4:45

different

4:46

experience from where I was to where I am now. Over the past a little over a

4:51

year now, I've

4:52

been a part of Comline group acting as their vice president for aftermarket and

4:58

services.

4:58

And in fact, I remember we met sometime in April. In fact, it might be just to

5:03

the date

5:04

last year at New York.

5:06

That was exactly your year of this time. Yes. So, I remember that conversation

5:11

with you

5:12

and I also remember that you had told us, hey, you guys are not ready yet. So,

5:19

I reflected

5:20

on the nine, I see you and I reflected on that. Like, yeah, maybe break is

5:26

right. We

5:28

want to just crawl before we walk and run. So, it was good advice by the way.

5:33

I appreciate it. Sometimes the experience helps, right? But, you know, it's

5:38

interesting

5:38

story. So, if I do the math, you spent almost 11 years in Cummins. And like I

5:42

said, Cummins

5:43

is a 34 billion, 75,000 employees. Cummins is also a very diverse company in

5:48

terms of

5:49

product, right? We know this for Jen says they make engines and make a whole

5:52

bunch of

5:52

other things. What business were you in?

5:55

In the aftermarket business supporting various segments. So, throughout my

6:03

career, I supported

6:04

all sorts of segments. So, back in India and even here in the US, so I

6:09

supported at various

6:11

stages, industrial segments like mining, marine, oil and gas and power

6:17

generation and automotive.

6:20

So, my last role at Cummins was when I was leading the small engines, small and

6:26

medium

6:27

engines aftermarket business, which primarily plays in the automotive segment.

6:34

But, because

6:35

these years I have had experience across all segments.

6:39

Now, I'm going to, before I get to the come line story and aftermarket, you

6:44

know, Cummins

6:45

has always been known to be two things, right? One is a very robust aftermarket

6:50

, well developed

6:52

aftermarketing services business. I mean, I know you guys have invested, when

6:55

you have

6:56

invested tons of money in building this business out, this point number one.

7:00

Point number two,

7:02

they also had a very strong channel parking network in terms of being able to

7:06

go to market

7:06

and reach the big customer base that they have. How was that experience working

7:12

in indirect

7:13

channel for you as an aftermarket leader?

7:16

Yep. So, you're absolutely right in your assessment of the Cummins aftermarket,

7:21

which

7:22

is a very, very strong aftermarket business, very robust, even during times of

7:28

recession

7:28

or downturns. The aftermarket business would always hold steady. And it was

7:33

originally

7:34

thought that aftermarket business is counter-cyclical where in good times the

7:38

aftermarket business

7:39

would go down and bad times the aftermarket business would thrive. But what we

7:44

saw was

7:45

the good times of bad times aftermarket business was always the bedrock of not

7:51

just Cummins

7:53

top line, but more so of bottom line. It's a very profitable business. And a

7:59

lot of times

8:00

where you have to get that extra money aftermarket is where we would get that

8:06

extra money. So,

8:08

anyway, so in terms of the importance of the business, I think the organization

8:13

itself

8:13

has invested a lot to grow the business and provide all the tools and resources

8:21

to the

8:22

business and to people like me to make us successful professionals and help us

8:29

run the

8:29

business successfully.

8:31

From that standpoint, I feel like the investment at Cummins did was significant

8:38

. It also helped

8:39

me learn a lot of things that have been passed so many years. And then when I

8:45

joined Comline,

8:46

I realized how valuable the experience was. So, I don't know, when you are in

8:52

the world,

8:52

you don't know what's happening. But when you jump out, the world is when you

8:56

realize,

8:56

okay, what you were experiencing. So, I think it was really fantastic and

9:01

memorable experience

9:02

for me and it helped me grow as an aftermarket professional.

9:07

You know, can I pick on a couple of things? You said something important, right

9:09

? So, Cummins

9:10

invested not just in the business itself of aftermarket, but the people in that

9:14

business

9:14

itself, right? They gave people like you an opportunity to grow pretty quickly

9:19

as senior

9:20

leaders.

9:21

How was that? I mean, tell me a little bit about the culture because one of my

9:24

recent

9:25

guests said to me that it is a mindset, right, in terms of how people think

9:29

about the aftermarket

9:30

business is not an afterthought, but it really is either forefront of the

9:33

business and the

9:34

connection to the customer and therefore, putting your best people forward is

9:37

actually important.

9:39

It seems to me, at least on the outside looking and that's how Cummins always

9:41

thought about

9:42

it. Is that an accurate maybe a judgment from the outside?

9:48

I think it evolved. So, the thought process evolved a lot in the past 11, 12

9:54

years while

9:55

I was there and it evolved a lot. So, I will tell you that when I joined

10:01

initially the

10:02

feeling I had and the feeling a lot of my leadership had there was that the

10:07

rest of the

10:08

organization still thought of aftermarket as an afterthought. So, that was

10:13

definitely

10:14

the feeling and the general perception that we had when I started, but I know

10:22

that the

10:23

leadership back home in India as well as here in the US did a lot of work and a

10:32

lot of

10:32

selling internal selling really across other businesses to showcase the

10:38

importance of aftermarket

10:40

and the other thing with Cummins is that Cummins does encourage a lot of

10:44

internal movement.

10:45

So, we as aftermarket organization would export talent to various motions of

10:52

the business

10:53

which really helped. So, people at junior levels all the way to the vice

10:58

president levels we

10:59

would have aftermarket people going outside of aftermarket and running those

11:04

businesses.

11:04

So, I think that really helped champion the cause of aftermarket business and

11:13

also showcased

11:14

how important we were in terms of establishing the customer experience and

11:21

establishing how

11:22

important we were on the profitability side as well. So, I think that the folks

11:26

who would

11:27

be listening to the podcast a lot of them would be aftermarket professionals

11:31

and I think

11:32

all of them realize how important aftermarket is a special bottom line of a

11:36

country. But

11:37

then outside of our aftermarket group it is a little bit difficult for people

11:42

to totally

11:43

comprehend how important and how much dollar of profit impact as the after

11:50

market business

11:51

get. There's two different things you said out there which is interesting. One

11:56

is the

11:57

aftermarket group in India and the US they go and export people into other

12:02

functional

12:03

and other parts of the business and I come in. So, there's a broader

12:06

appreciation. My

12:07

guess is there was a reverse as well. So, people from the product side and

12:11

other sides

12:12

are coming into the aftermarket. So, there's a good cross-pollination of talent

12:16

that's

12:16

point number one. The other thing actually is find interesting and this is

12:20

actually one

12:21

of the things that's important is that you're not going to be able to do

12:21

something pretty

12:22

powerful about large companies like Cummins, global companies like Cummins is.

12:26

You were

12:26

born and brought up in India, you went to school in India, you started in Cumm

12:29

ins, India

12:31

after business school but they moved you from India to the US into a role with

12:38

the US territories

12:39

and stuff and they basically expected to come in and perform out here just the

12:43

way you should.

12:44

I mean, that's a pretty amazing investment they made in talent as well.

12:48

Yeah, and I will tell you again, maybe I'm repeating myself but Cummins did

12:53

spend a lot

12:54

of time building these processes in place so that people like me would be plug

13:00

and play

13:01

in a different territory without much of an hassle really. And you come from

13:07

India as

13:08

well. So, I think the advantage that typically folks from India have is the

13:13

language. So,

13:14

we speak English, learning English. So, I think that was also another factor

13:18

that really helped

13:19

that from India to the US but I definitely credit Cummins a lot for the fact

13:26

that they

13:26

really established a lot of strong processes and they also encourage a lot of

13:30

movement,

13:31

not just within the business but within geography. So, it's really people,

13:36

people, somebody,

13:37

in fact, before I was leaving Cummins, I did hire one person from one of

13:43

African distributors.

13:47

It was fully owned by Cummins but he was running the distribution business in

13:53

one of

13:53

the countries in Africa. So, we imported him from there because of his

13:58

experience. So,

13:59

I think, and there's so many examples where Cummins would do it very frequently

14:05

to cross

14:06

coordinate and I think it really helps both the organization as well as the

14:10

people

14:11

and it's up to issue. But, you know, that I think is actually fascinating,

14:16

right? Because I

14:16

also worked many years ago at a large company that routinely moved people

14:19

across businesses,

14:20

across regions, across geographies all the time and we almost call it the

14:25

military life because you

14:26

almost expected every two, three years to move somewhere else. But it really

14:31

made you a very

14:31

flexible and growth-oriented leader because you're always thinking you always

14:35

have to learn fast.

14:36

And so, how did that manifest itself when you came to the US because you had to

14:41

learn a completely

14:42

new territory, you know, completely, yes, this Cummins process but a different

14:45

way of doing business

14:47

and how did that make you a better aftermarketer, better leader, figure it out

14:52

to market a better

14:52

leader. I mean, that'll be interesting for me to understand because I've always

14:55

been fascinated

14:56

about these companies like Cummins, Citibang, General Electric and others that

15:01

routinely move

15:01

people all over the world, you know. So, I would say I've always been lucky,

15:08

knock on wood with my managers and leadership, whether in India or here in the

15:13

US. So, I think,

15:14

when I moved to the US, I knew how the aftermarket processes run and you have

15:23

the aftermarket business

15:24

really runs in India. But when I came to the US, it was me getting charge of

15:31

all territories. So,

15:32

all 195 countries that Cummins plays in, I had responsibilities for them,

15:40

mining and

15:40

mining and marine and all in the ass businesses of when I came here.

15:46

So, I think my leadership team really helped me a lot in coming up to speed and

15:53

helping me

15:55

understand what were the nuances of doing business in the US and also doing

16:01

business

16:01

outside of the US. Now, because I had already had experience in India, you know

16:07

, in a growing

16:08

economy, part of it really helped me deal with other similar economies. And

16:13

when I say similar,

16:14

not in terms of size, but in terms of say customer price sensitivity, for

16:18

example, in Latin America,

16:20

it's much more easy for somebody like me to understand what the dynamics were,

16:25

because again,

16:26

you know, customers are very price sensitive, very scrappy, very, you know,

16:31

innovative in their

16:33

in how they use the engines and how they fix the engines and how we sold parts.

16:38

So, I think some

16:39

of the appreciation, because I was in India, I was able to apply it there.

16:44

Whereas, you know,

16:45

when I was dealing with really, you know, customers in territories like US or

16:51

South Africa, Australia,

16:53

big mining customers for only downtime really mattered. So, that was very

16:59

different where I had,

17:00

you know, significantly different leverage on pricing and availability really

17:05

mattered a lot

17:06

more than being scrappy or being innovative about this, because those guys were

17:09

like, yeah,

17:10

when I need a part, I needed within 24 hours, I want my dump trucks and shovels

17:15

to be running

17:16

24, 7, 365. So, I think to circle back to your question, it was a lot to do

17:23

with my leadership

17:24

care in the US and the experience that I had from India that helped me quickly

17:29

grow in the

17:32

you know, more global business that I was responsible for customers across the

17:36

entire world. And I'd be

17:38

all across the world, like all the countries. You know, that's amazing that a

17:41

young

17:41

guy should get that experience. But I think that's something you said that I've

17:44

now heard

17:44

multiple times from people who I interviewed, which is the people around you

17:48

matter a lot,

17:49

but above you as a people we report to and the people below slash around you as

17:54

a supportive network.

17:56

The other thing you said, which is actually interesting and I want to bring

17:59

that forward to

17:59

your current job is effectively what you're really saying is that even though I

18:04

grew up in the

18:05

Cummins world and Cummins process, there was no one size fits all because I had

18:09

to think

18:09

differently for Latin America versus South Africa versus US versus something

18:13

else. And the ability

18:14

for you now to have done that gives you a sense of appreciation for not just

18:19

different cultures

18:20

with different business practices, different conditions. And you can embed that

18:25

muscle memory

18:26

if you may, right, in terms of how you take it forward. So now fast forward to

18:30

a new job. I know

18:31

Cummins was a large public to company. Comline is a privately held private

18:36

equity owned company.

18:37

What is the motivation that they had to go hire somebody like you? What was

18:43

going on in your CEO's

18:43

mind? The investor's mind to say, we need to go hire a VP of aftermarket

18:48

because if I remember

18:49

correctly, there was no such role before, right? Yep, exactly. So I think the

18:55

motivation behind

18:56

Denai and Sotanis are CEO, Denai and the investor group, where somebody from

19:01

our aftermarket was,

19:02

I think maybe multi-fold, but one of the most important thing was that they had

19:09

been in the

19:09

acquisition spree. So when I entered, I think they had already acquired six or

19:15

seven companies

19:16

on the platform companies or Comline Sanderson is the platform company, but

19:20

they did end up acquiring

19:21

six or seven companies. Every business had an aftermarket business inside them.

19:26

So they needed

19:27

someone to be able to drive common processes and a common aftermarket related

19:35

best practices,

19:37

especially on pricing and product management across the board. So they needed

19:42

somebody who

19:44

could make that happen because you would know that some of, or most of these

19:48

small businesses,

19:49

they are also very, in terms of resources, there's not a lot of people there.

19:55

So just a few people

19:57

do a lot of things. So it's difficult to move people out and help, you know,

20:02

drive that corporate

20:03

wide actions, which is why they wanted somebody like me to come in and drive,

20:09

and drive these

20:10

corporation wide initiatives. So just for listeners, if you don't mind, maybe

20:18

you can explain in 30

20:19

seconds or a minute, what does Comline do? What kind of markets is it? What

20:22

kind of products is

20:23

built? Who do you, what markets you sell it? It'll be great to just kind of get

20:27

a quick snapshot

20:28

of that. So so Comline is majorly, it's a private equity owned company, but it

20:35

's majorly involved

20:37

in providing equipment for separation. So whether it's a solid liquid

20:42

separation,

20:44

liquid liquid separation, solid gas separation, etc. So if you think about

20:48

municipal waste,

20:51

so that's a good example of a solid liquid separation. We have a municipal as a

21:00

big segment,

21:00

we have agriculture also as a very big segment. So if you think about corn, you

21:05

know, corn

21:05

wet milling, so you separate the protein starts fiber from the corn. So you are

21:12

a bit to extract

21:13

those using Comline equipment. We also have a unit that supports RO or

21:19

manufacturers and deploys

21:21

RO or reverse osmosis equipment. So that's like on the cleaner side of cleaning

21:27

the water side of

21:28

things. We have stormwater as well. So one of our businesses operates in a

21:35

stormwater side of things.

21:37

Then one business operates in the food and beverage side for doing this

21:42

installation. So for example,

21:44

if you think about Coca-Cola or Dasani, all the coke brands where our business

21:51

goes and installs piping for those. So it's a lot to do with some of these

21:57

segments,

21:58

usually solid liquid liquid, solid gas separation, but also some of these

22:04

related businesses.

22:06

So when we are looking at when Danai is looking at businesses,

22:11

I think there's always some commonality of customers and some sort of adjacency

22:15

that comes with the next business with the current business.

22:18

So it's interesting. So you said first of all, thank you for that. That is a

22:21

good

22:22

background for that. So when you think about the aftermarket, like I said, six

22:25

divisions, six

22:26

acquisitions, they all had aftermarket in there. So the question is how do you

22:31

then take that

22:33

and make it into one? Well, what is the same in the last year you spent in

22:36

really

22:36

not just coming up to speed, but really organizing the put in the team together

22:41

the practices, the processes, what have those priorities been for you?

22:46

One of the things that I started working on immediately was pricing. So I think

22:55

one of the

22:56

things that we wanted to do was to have the right pricing processes in place so

23:02

that we have

23:03

annual pricing actions and we are able to do inflation adjustments year on year

23:09

and have the

23:09

same common process across all the businesses. So we have end of December or

23:17

first of Jan pricing

23:19

action. So you communicate with your customers that this will be a new price

23:24

list. So that's

23:25

something that not all businesses were doing it as frequently or as method

23:31

ically as some of the

23:33

businesses were doing. So my job was to have the same processes established

23:39

across the board plus

23:41

bring in my insights from comments as to what would be some best practices on

23:46

the pricing side.

23:47

Then also on the services side, I think we had some differences between

23:54

businesses charging

23:55

different rates to different kind of customers. So some businesses were doing

23:59

it better than the

24:00

others. So how do you bring those best practices from one of the business and

24:04

spread it across

24:05

across the board? Same thing with products. So some businesses are much better

24:11

at doing the right

24:13

kit for their machines. So how do you get those processes out of that business

24:17

and also

24:18

deploy it across the other businesses? And at the same time, all of these were

24:23

experiences that I had had back at comments. So it wasn't new in terms of the

24:31

processes themselves.

24:32

But I think operating in a much smaller environment which a lot less resources,

24:38

a lot less people

24:39

was the challenge, but a real fun part of it. It's fascinating. There's a whole

24:45

host of

24:45

harmonization stuff you did. So you're making sure that you're not really

24:48

bringing in best

24:49

practices or amounts and not just comments, but there's general best practices

24:52

from outside.

24:53

But even within the six divisions, you found different practices and try to

24:56

make them the same.

24:57

You're going to create a homogeneous organization to some degree, not

25:00

completely homogeneous, but

25:02

somewhat homogeneous. Now, when I think about the challenges of going from a

25:07

behemoth like a Cummins to a little nimble minnow like a Comline, what are the

25:12

big differences

25:13

you found besides the fact that huge amount of resources, very light resources,

25:17

what was a

25:18

big thing you found in terms of establishing an aftermarketing service business

25:22

there?

25:22

I think coming in a smaller business, I did have some expectation or I would

25:31

say

25:33

did not have expectations around structure or around processes. And people

25:40

generally try to

25:42

do things in the way that they think is most efficient. And usually what

25:48

happens is people

25:49

doing the same job for a very long time. So I think there is a lot of expertise

25:56

with each of the people that I deal with, but then at the same time,

26:02

they may not be abreast with the latest happenings in the aftermarket or latest

26:08

tools and processes

26:10

that are now available that are not available in say 20 years back. So I think

26:14

that was one of

26:15

the biggest things that the teams, again, various businesses were at various

26:22

maturity levels,

26:24

but some of them were far more mature in terms of using these new processes and

26:28

techniques and so

26:29

forth and others were still on say paper pen way of doing business. So that was

26:37

one thing where

26:39

at comments, it was like everything was well defined, you had to run just run

26:44

here. It was

26:45

the exciting piece was you also get to set how things should work and how

26:50

what should be the path for each of these and then make sure that your people

26:57

are able to

26:58

adapt to the new way of doing things. So I think a lot of structure versus

27:02

complete lack of structure

27:03

and trying to bring that structure, which for me, it was super exciting. So I

27:08

know that a lot of

27:09

people may not like this complete lack of and I wouldn't say complete, but

27:15

general lack of structure

27:17

or general resource crunch if you may run. But I think I enjoyed a lot and I

27:24

thrive it.

27:25

And again, it also goes back to folks from India and again, I guess you can

27:30

relate to it. I mean,

27:31

you've probably lived in Mumbai, right? You grew up in Mumbai, so did I. I mean

27:35

you only get limited space. You only have limited time. You only have limited

27:40

water supply. Everything

27:42

is limited. So you do learn to work with limited resources. So it feels like

27:47

home field when you're

27:48

like, okay, yeah, we're back to where we were. So I think that is a place that

27:52

I really enjoy.

27:54

It's definitely different from comments where all the sources are available to

27:58

you, but

27:59

here are limited resources, but then you have a lot of flexibility to make

28:04

changes and you have

28:05

a lot of latitude of doing things. Right. Now it's amazing what you said is the

28:09

constrained economy

28:10

in some ways kind of creates innovation there. Right. Now, also one difference

28:15

is public company

28:16

versus private equity owned company. And we all know private equity is probably

28:20

has singularly

28:21

focused and driving results as any. Does that doesn't I'm a variant on what

28:27

your CEO and your

28:28

board expect from you in terms of results and velocity of decisions and

28:32

velocity of performance

28:33

and stuff like that? How does that how does that play itself out? So I've only

28:40

worked at two

28:41

really big companies. And then one smaller company, the big companies have been

28:45

publicly owned and the one small company or mid-sized companies privately owned

28:49

. So I don't know if it

28:51

is a factor of the size of the company itself or the ownership, but I wouldn't

28:59

say that there is a

29:00

lot of in terms of the way company operates. I don't think it would be any

29:05

different or much

29:07

different if it was publicly owned versus privately owned. I think a lot of it

29:10

is just a function of

29:11

just the size of the company. Right. Now, definitely, the CEO's and the board's

29:17

expectations would be that we run and we run quickly. But then this is also why

29:22

I joined it

29:22

because I wanted to run quickly. I wanted to do things quickly. So I think from

29:26

that standpoint,

29:27

their expectation and my expectations match quite a bit. So I don't know if

29:32

that is really a product

29:34

of being in a private equity or just being a part of a group that wants to run

29:38

businesses more efficiently.

29:42

I focus and my CEO, Denai and investors, they all care a lot and focus a lot

29:49

about customers.

29:50

I think financials are definitely important, but I always hear them also talk

29:54

about customers a

29:55

lot. Don't throw up your customers. Don't make your customers angry. So that's

30:02

a common theme

30:04

that I hear from the leadership here as well. So I don't know that it's

30:08

anything different than

30:11

what you would get in a bigger company. So now when you think about these

30:16

experiences,

30:17

I've had only a year at Comline, 11 years plus at Cummins. Commonality is lots

30:23

of aftermarket

30:24

experience. Probably I'd say a dozen years, it's probably a dozen years in many

30:27

ways,

30:27

as many years, more than many people let me know. But if you step back for a

30:34

second,

30:34

I say if I were to ask you, Jay, what separates what I would say aftermarket

30:39

champions from the rest?

30:41

What would you tell the listeners, tell the people who listen to this podcast

30:45

or so?

30:46

Here are the two or three things that stand out in your mind, just a general

30:49

experience,

30:50

right? Not particularly the Accenture versus Comline versus, but do you see it

30:53

enough now?

30:54

You have to form an opinion. So I think the biggest thing I would say is that

31:00

customer experience

31:02

and customer loyalty are really, really, really built in the aftermarket. It

31:07

does not happen

31:09

during the equipment sale. So of course, you have to have a solid equipment.

31:12

You have to

31:13

sell a great engine for a customer to love it, but then at the same time, you

31:18

sell it within

31:19

three months or six months, but then they run it for the next 20, 30, 40, 50

31:23

years. So that's

31:25

the play where aftermarket comes in. So over these years, what I've realized is

31:30

aftermarket is where

31:31

customer experience is built, customer loyalty is built, and that's where

31:34

repeat customers are

31:36

built. So I think that's one of the biggest things. The other thing also is,

31:41

again,

31:42

I would say gang of aftermarket people, we know that profitability is driven

31:47

from aftermarket.

31:49

Dompline is driven from the equipment side or capital side of the business, but

31:54

really,

31:55

profitability is driven from aftermarket. And that's something that I've seen,

32:01

whether it's comments or whether it's Comline, that's true across the board.

32:05

And even at other companies, I have friends and a lot of other organizations

32:09

that operate in

32:10

the aftermarket. And that's another common thing that I always see, that's a

32:15

place where you build

32:16

profitability, but that's also the place where you build loyalty with the

32:21

customers. And I think

32:22

the last thing I would say is you get to experience the entire lifecycle of

32:29

your equipment alongside

32:32

with the customers when you are in the aftermarket. Usually, the equipment guys

32:37

would sell the new

32:38

equipment and usually their interaction dwindles significantly after that, but

32:43

you are really living

32:44

with the customer for a long, long time. And that's not just one person, but as

32:49

a group,

32:50

you are living that experience with a customer. What happens at year zero, year

32:55

10, year 20,

32:56

year 30. I love the one of my team or one of my guys at PPAC on New Jersey. I

33:04

think he spent like

33:05

44 years in the company. And then the other day he was describing to me that an

33:11

equipment

33:12

or parts request came to him for an equipment that was even older than him. And

33:19

he's nearing

33:19

68, 69 years old. So he's telling me, hey, this is older than I am. So it is

33:25

amazing.

33:26

Just to see how much, what is the latitude of experiences,

33:33

our customer experiences that you get to experience when you are in the after

33:37

market.

33:38

So I think just living through the entire lifecycle of your equipment and the

33:41

your customer.

33:41

It's actually something interesting you said that I actually taken away from

33:46

many people,

33:47

right? Many of our guests have said the same thing, which is there's very few

33:50

places in a company

33:51

that have the breadth of relationship, really depth of relationship with the

33:55

customers that

33:56

aftermarket people do. It's a continuity experience and making sure the

33:59

experience goes

34:00

is consistent and solid all the way through the lifecycle is really important.

34:05

And the profitability

34:06

comes as a result of some of the stuffs you do. But it's actually a common

34:10

theme across most of the

34:11

people that separate the good companies from the bad, which is they pay

34:14

attention to these

34:15

experiences. They pay attention to the lifecycle or lifetime and lifecycle

34:19

value delivered to the

34:20

customer. And that's something to keep in mind. You've had such amazing

34:25

experiences and aftermarket

34:26

and service in the last dozen, 15 years now, as you look back across the things

34:33

that you've done so far,

34:34

I love this in the podcast like you do. I always ask this question from my

34:42

favorite

34:42

podcast, a guy, Raz asks his guests, right? If you look at your career of the

34:45

last 15 years plus

34:46

15, 20 years, Jayesh, you know, how much of your success, because you've

34:50

achieved some pretty

34:50

good success so far. How much of a do you ascribe to luck? And how much of it

34:55

is just because you're

34:56

just, you know, smart and, you know, better talented than most of the people

35:01

there, right? What's your

35:03

what's your take on things there? By the way, I know guide us as well. I listen

35:07

to all his

35:08

forecast. Yeah, he is amazing. And I kind of knew this question was coming

35:14

because I know you like

35:15

guide us as well. So I'll tell you, I think it's, I don't have a percentage,

35:22

but I would say I've

35:23

been luckier than talented. That's something I would tell you. It's whether it

35:29

was at Cummins

35:30

in India or whether it was Cummins here in the US and then to come like, I feel

35:35

like I was in the

35:37

right place at the right time, a lot of times. So that helped me get into the

35:44

opportunities

35:45

that I got a chance to. So I think a lot of it was definitely just being there,

35:50

at the right place at the right time. And I've had really good mentors and good

35:57

leaders all over

35:59

all across my career, whether it was back in Accenture or at Cummins and even

36:04

at Comma right

36:05

now, I've always had really good mentors and a really good set of people that I

36:11

worked with.

36:11

So my network has always really helped me connect to various opportunities over

36:17

time.

36:17

And then the one thing I would say though is that I love learning. So I do like

36:24

to learn new

36:25

things. I do like to get into the depth of things. I do get very well attached

36:30

to my work and it's

36:32

you know, it's a very positive attachment. I love what I do. And so far it has

36:37

happened that I

36:38

really loved what I have done. So that also helped me perform more, you know,

36:46

go that extra mile

36:47

in everything I do. So I think that that also plays a role. But I would say,

36:51

yes, I've been

36:52

fortunate. I've been in touch with a lot of really smart people and really

36:58

people who really

37:00

trusted in me for so many years. And that's what helped me growing as well,

37:06

growing in my career.

37:08

So you know, that's actually amazing because that's what I hear again, you know

37:11

, more people than

37:12

not ascribe being in the right place in the right time, being surrounded by

37:15

people who give you the

37:16

chance to go succeed. And then you need drive that makes you different and take

37:20

advantage

37:21

of being in the right place in the right time. So that's really good. That's it

37:25

's so good to you.

37:25

So Jayce, really appreciate this discussion has been fascinating again. I think

37:30

one of the first

37:31

people I've talked to had such diverse size wise experiences in terms of

37:36

companies global from

37:37

India to here. And so it's actually great to kind of give you a perspective on

37:41

it. And it's been

37:42

fun conversation. So thank you for being a guest today. Appreciate your time

37:46

today.

37:46

Thank you, I had a great time as always chatting with you. Thank you so much.

37:50

Thank you.

37:59

As we complete another enlightening episode, I extend my sincere gratitude to

38:04

our esteemed guests and

38:05

you, our valued listeners. If today's conversation resonated with you, please

38:10

subscribe to this

38:11

podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or Google Play. I'll simply visit a website

38:17

at www.intitle.com

38:18

for more interesting content. Remember, the pursuit of aftermarket decks is an

38:23

ongoing journey.

38:24

And I look forward to continuing with you. Until next time, stay informed, stay

38:28

inspired,

38:29

and continue championing aftermarket success.

38:32

Thank you.

38:36

[end]

39:28

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